Review: Sea Swept (Chesapeake Bay Saga #1) By Nora Roberts

sea swept

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A champion boat racer, Cameron Quinn traveled the world spending his winnings on champagne and women. But when his dying father called him home to care for Seth, a troubled young boy not unlike Cameron once was, his life changed overnight…

After years of independence, Cameron had to learn to live with his brothers again, while he struggled with cooking, cleaning, and caring for a difficult boy. Old rivalries and new resentments flared between Cameron and his brothers, but they tried to put aside their differences for Seth’s sake. In the end, a social worker would decide Seth’s fate, and as tough as she was beautiful, she had the power to bring the Quinns together–or tear them apart…

I really wanted to like this book more than I did. REALLY, really wanted to like it more. And I can’t say that I didn’t enjoy parts of it – even most of it – but the reality is that while I enjoyed aspects of the book the romance fell flat for me. Flatter than Flat Stanley. I just did not believe the romance…at all.

The entire idea that a conscientious Social Worker – such as the heroine (Anna Spinelli) is portrayed as – would get into a romantic and sexual relationship with a family that she was investigating was absurd. I kept expecting her to get disciplined or something. It’s crazy unethical to say the least. And so I just couldn’t believe the romance. Especially since the relationship between Anna and Cameron went from adversarial to sexsexsex to “love” in a very short time period. It annoyed me so much that I skipped all of the sex scenes.

What DID interest me (and what kept my attention enough to complete the novel) was the back story. Wow. SUCH a touching story. The hero – Cameron – was adopted (as a teen) by this couple who also adopted two other troubled boys. The couple raised them with love and each grew into productive (and successful!) members of society. The mother dies and the beginning of the book starts with the [accidental] death of the father. All of his sons have gathered together and their father tells them that they need to take care of his latest adopted son, Seth.

Seth is the mystery: who is his mother? Why was he being adopted? What happened to him to make him scared of adults? How can three (unmarried) men learn to raise a troubled teenager? All of these questions are the real story in this romance book. I felt the romantic relationship between Anna and Cameron was only there to help forward the plot of the brothers and Seth. Watching these grown men learn to take care of a young boy and all of the assorted issues that come along when a child is abused was the storyline that kept me engrossed in this book. I was SUPER annoyed to learn that the entire story would be played out over the series installments (when I was hoping that each installment would have its only issues).

I picked this book up on one of my (many forays to the Goodwill Used book store) so I paid less than $0.75 for it. I will not continue this series – unless I can also get those books for $0.75 each. But if they are dropped in my hands I will read it. I really want to know that Seth will end up happy.

So – others may enjoy this book quite a bit but it fell quite short of the goal for me.

 

 

 

 

About this Author:  Nora Roberts was born in Silver Spring, Maryland, the youngest of five children. After a school career that included some time in Catholic school and the discipline of nuns, she married young and settled in Keedysville, Maryland.

Nora is a member of several writers groups and has won countless awards from her colleagues and the publishing industry. Recently The New Yorker called her “America’s favorite novelist.”

 

 

 

 

This review can also be found at Booklikes.

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